The Best Recipe For When You’re Hosting 2 or 10, According to Food52

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Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, founders of Food52, run their site with a simple to goal: to help their community “eat thoughtfully and live joyfully.” Since 2008, the duo has been inspiring us to get in the kitchen and cook through stunning photography and dishes that appeal to bona fide foodies and novices alike. They have a knack for demystifying the world of entertaining and hosting, while of course presenting recipes—they’ve amassed over 60,000 of them—that even we (five-ingredient aficionadas) can recreate. Who better to propose a dish that can function as your “ace in the hole” all season long? Read on for a recipe—from their brand-new book A New Way to Dinner—that can function as a main, a side or a snack.

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Eden’s 5-Ingredient Grilled Peach and Burrata Salad

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Just in time to catch the end of peach season this September, we invited ourselves over to our friend Eden Grinshpan’s, a Canadian-born chef whose love for inventive dishes (like shaved-coconut green beans and honey-sage grilled cheese) turned into a globe-trotting series on the Cooking Channel. So when she offered to teach us how to make her simple but innovative 5-ingredient grilled peach and burrata salad, we couldn’t say no.

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Fernanda’s 5-Ingredient Zucchini Noodles with Homemade Pesto

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The first fall weekends are all about the subtle slow-down—remembering to grab that extra layer, our favorite shows returning to their rightful Thursday night spots, evenings starting a little earlier—and the way we cook is no exception. We asked our friend Fernanda de la Puente, a Peruvian, New-York based holistic nutritionist, for a summer-to-fall recipe you can make in five minutes or less, with just five ingredients.

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Fernanda’s 5-Ingredient Pineapple Guacamole

140606_MWSM_FernandaRecipes_245 The last place we want to be on a steamy summer weekend is in front of a hot stove, but a girl’s gotta eat and, if she’s lucky, maybe entertain a few friends. We paid a visit to our foodie friend Fernanda de la Puente and sampled her crowd-pleasing cool-down summer snack.

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Eat Well: Fernanda’s 5-Ingredient Chia Smoothie

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Armed with the belief that clean eating doesn’t need to involve more ingredients than a great outfit—or take longer than getting dressed—we asked Peruvian-born, New York-based holistic nutritionist Fernanda de la Puente for a few five-ingredients-or-less recipes. (As she put it, “food shouldn’t be stressful. The meal is a moment in time, even if it’s just breakfast alone.”) This month, she schooled us on the ingredient of the moment: chia seeds.

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How to Make the Perfect Cup of Coffee (in Our Coffeeshop Cardigan)

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We’re big fans of our Coffeeshop Cardigan: Ultrasoft with an easy, slouchy fit, this cozy layer is the ideal companion for  your deliciously lazy, curl-up-with-magazines-and-coffee kind of mornings. We’re also longtime fans of Intelligentsia Coffee, the Chicago-born company that’s committed to eco-friendly, socially sustainable growing practices, with beans that remind us just how good good coffee can be. We knew the two had to meet, so we asked Stephen Morrissey, I.C.’s brewmaster (and 2008 World Barista Champion), for the inside scoop on making a coffee shop-caliber cup without leaving home. Happily for us, he obliged.

What You’ll Need:
Whole beans Get them no later than two weeks after their roasting date (which should be stamped on the bag). “Buy coffee like you’d buy your bread—fresh and in small amounts,” says Morrissey.
An electric burr grinder (as opposed to a blade grinder, which can chop beans unevenly). Because coffee beans start losing their aroma, and therefore their flavor, as soon as they’re ground, Morrissey recommends grinding beans as close to brewing time as possible. Otherwise, he adds, “flavors you’d  like to keep for your cup have already escaped.”
A glass manual coffeemaker Morrissey’s cool with a simple French press. Glass canister styles, like Chemex or Melitta, work too. (These allow you to hand pour the water directly over the ground coffee.)
A digital food scale (It can sound like a bit much, we know, but it can actually come in handy in the kitchen.) “When you only eyeball the ingredients, you will often end up with something too bitter or watery,” says our expert.

How To Do It:
Use 15 grams of coffee (roughly two and a half heaping tablespoons of unground beans) per 8 ounces of water. Boil water and let sit for 30 seconds before pouring over grounds or into your French press. (To take it from here, consult the brew guide for your coffeemaker.)

And remember, says Morrissey, you don’t have to buy a super-dark roast if you like it strong; it can be bitter. “If you want a heftier cup, simply use more coffee or grind your beans a little finer.”

Bonus tip: With coffee this good, if you’re game, you can probably skip the sweeteners and/or the cream. “When you add milk and sugar to great coffee, it can dumb down the flavor,” says Morrissey. May we suggest taking yours with a Coffeeshop Cardigan?

An Easy, Tasty Thanksgiving Biscuit Recipe From Cherry Bombe Magazine

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What’s one great side dish to contribute to Thanksgiving dinner when you’re short on time and inspiration but really need to deliver (and takeout’s not an option)? That’s the simple but crucial question we asked Kerry Diamond and Claudia Wu, the sustenance, style and, of course, taste behind Cherry Bombe, the biannual women-in-food mag that is our—and everyone we know’s—latest obsession. (In fact, we’re such fans that we sponsored the latest issue.) Their answer: the pillowy biscuits served at Seersucker, the Southern-influenced Brooklyn restaurant Diamond co-owns. Difficulty grade: E for Easy. Deliciousness grade: A for Amazing. All in under an hour, which leaves you time to whip up Seersucker’s trademark molasses butter (and earn major bonus points while you’re at it).

Seersucker’s Biscuits
Ingredients:
7 cups cake flour (keep some extra handy, for rolling biscuits)
3 Tbsp. baking powder
1½ tsp. baking soda
1½ tsp. salt
¾ cup lard
3 cups cold buttermilk
4 Tbsp. melted unsalted butter
Fleur de sel (sea salt)

Directions:
Sift the dry ingredients together. Cut in the lard with a pastry cutter (crosshatching the lard by raking two knives in opposite directions works too) and add the buttermilk, mixing well with a spoon. Empty the bowl onto a well-floured surface and knead until a soft dough forms, adding pinches of flour to prevent stickiness. Roll out the dough with a floured rolling pin (or wine bottle) until it’s a half-inch thick, and cut out biscuit shapes. (An upside-down drinking glass works perfectly.)

Preheat the oven to 425° F, and cover a baking sheet with aluminum foil, shiny side up. Butter the foil and arrange the biscuits on it, barely touching. Glaze the tops with butter and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes until the tops are golden brown.

Serve immediately with butter, preserves or honey. If traveling, let cool, then wrap in a fresh, decorative dishtowel. (Leave the towel behind, et voilà—hostess gift.)

Seersucker’s Salted Molasses Butter
Ingredients:
1 lb. unsalted butter
2 Tbsp. molasses
1½ tsp. kosher salt

Directions:
Let butter soften. With a soft spatula or wooden spoon, mix in the molasses and salt together. Serve with warm biscuits.